Gay Rights Advocates Condemn Virginia Tax Policy

Gay Rights Advocates Condemn Virginia Tax Policy

Photo: WINA

A local advocate for gay rights believes Virginia condones tax discrimination. Federal officials have decided that married same-sex couples must file their tax returns jointly no matter where they live. If these gay and lesbian couples live in a state where same-sex marriages are recognized, they do the same with their state returns. Virginia is among the majority of states where same-sex mariages are not recognized, and partners must file their state tax returns as individuals. Amy Sarah Marshall of the Charlottesville Pride Community Network says being forced to file as individuals poses a hardship for many gay and lesbian couples. Some of Virginia’s advocates for same sex marriage (pictured) are trying to repeal an amendment to the state constitution that voters approved in November 2006. It defines a marriage as the union of one man and one woman.


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